Haruki Murakami to appear at Guardian’s book club at Edinburgh International Book Festival

Haruki Murakami will make an appearance this Saturday at 3 PM at the Guardian’s book club discussion with John Mullan. He will talk about his new novel and answer some pre-selected fan questions.

You can send in questions you would like him to answer using the comments section of this Guardian article. There will not be a book signing.

Tickets for the book club discussion with Murakami are already sold out.

I reached out my hand. No one was beside me. I was alone, abandoned, at the edge of the world.
Haruki Murakami - Dance Dance Dance

Anonymous said: Do you know why there is a difference in page lengths between the American version (400 pages) of Colorless and the international version (300 pages). Also there are about 10 or so spelling errors that I picked out in the edition that I bought.

It’s because of different book designs, obviously. Different print, different font, the American book being overall smaller etc.

Can’t comment on spelling errors.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage
by Ray Kimura

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

by Ray Kimura

theliterarysnob said: Do you guys know who designed the US cover for Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki?

Can’t find confirmation but I’m assuming Chip Kidd who also did 1Q84.

Anonymous said: I have yet to read my first Murakami novel and I'm torn about which translation to purchase. Would you, and anyone else, recommend the german or english translation? I usually try to read books in their original languages but sadly Japanese is not a language I'm fluent in, and i don't know which of them would be more truthful to his original in, in both language and tone.

As someone who has read the books in both German and English I can tell you that I often felt different emotions about them — not in a negative sense, mind you. It’s just that re-reading Murakami books in different translations can be a very refreshing experience due to the plain style of his original writing and the free hand he offers his translators in painting his stories in a style of their own, without altering the story. I can only recommend everyone who likes his book to re-read them in all the languages you understand.

As for your original questions, personally I first read his books in German, then re-read them in English, then in German again. Both translations are very good from what I can say, although you may want to avoid the German version of The Wind Up Bird Chronicle for it’s a translation from the English, not the original Japanese text.

— mi

30% off on Murakami works at Powell's Books

Powell’s Books is currently offering a 30% discount on all Murakami titles featured in the link above. Go grab whatever you haven’t read yet or get yourself some copies for friends and family!

Thanks to sunnysunflowers for the tip.

Matthew Carl Strecher, a professor of Japanese language, literature, and culture at Winona State University, is going to release a new book in October 2014 called The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami.
Hardcore Harukists have probably heard his name before because he is also the author of Dances with Sheep: The Quest for Identity in the Fiction of Haruki Murakami and Haruki Murakami’s The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Reader’s Guide. There is no release date for this work yet, but University of Minnesota press have set up a book website with additional information and a table of contents. They were also very kind and sent us two advanced reading copies, so we will post more information very soon, likely in the form of some reviews and possibly a few quotations if the author is okay with this.
Here’s what Jay Rubin, Murakami translator and Strecher’s mentor for many years, has to say about the book:
"In a masterful synthesis, Matthew Strecher delves deeply into questions of language, religion, mythology, psychology, and the boundaries between literature and journalism to demonstrate with great clarity and concreteness how Murakami belongs in the company of such writers as Pynchon, Eco, and Rushdie."


/update: Aaaand I’m told you can already purchase the book! They got lucky and it went to prints early.

Matthew Carl Strecher, a professor of Japanese language, literature, and culture at Winona State University, is going to release a new book in October 2014 called The Forbidden Worlds of Haruki Murakami.

Hardcore Harukists have probably heard his name before because he is also the author of Dances with Sheep: The Quest for Identity in the Fiction of Haruki Murakami and Haruki Murakami’s The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Reader’s Guide. There is no release date for this work yet, but University of Minnesota press have set up a book website with additional information and a table of contents. They were also very kind and sent us two advanced reading copies, so we will post more information very soon, likely in the form of some reviews and possibly a few quotations if the author is okay with this.

Here’s what Jay Rubin, Murakami translator and Strecher’s mentor for many years, has to say about the book:

"In a masterful synthesis, Matthew Strecher delves deeply into questions of language, religion, mythology, psychology, and the boundaries between literature and journalism to demonstrate with great clarity and concreteness how Murakami belongs in the company of such writers as Pynchon, Eco, and Rushdie."

/update: Aaaand I’m told you can already purchase the book! They got lucky and it went to prints early.

Anonymous said: Is there any word on when the new short story collection will be translated into English

No news yet, but a German translation is set for October 2014.

— mi

Anonymous said: If you had to choose a Murakami quote to put in your high school year book, what would it be?

"Something will work out tomorrow, I thought. And if not, then tomorrow I’ll do some thinking. Ob-la-di, ob-la-da, life goes on."

— A Family Affair

Anonymous said: Hello! Lovely blog you guys have :) I wanna ask something. I read Pinball, 1973 a few years ago, and I just finished Hear The Wind Sing right now, I'm kinda confused - is it the same narrator, same Rat's friend? Because if I'm not mistaken (I can't remember well), in Pinball, 1973 he works with English translations, and in Hear The Wind Sing he studies Biology... Did he decide to work with translations instead of animals after graduating or something in the line? Thank you!

Yes, same Rat and same narrator. Also the same narrator as in “A Wild Sheep Chase” and “Dance Dance Dance”.

I think the shift in his line of work is explained in at least one of those four novels but it’s a little tricky to search for the excerpt if you don’t really know where to look. Maybe someone else knows the answer?

— mi

Aren’t you interested in what’s going on now in Tokyo?" Midorikawa asked. "It’s quite a spectacle. One uproar after another, every day. Like the whole world’s turned upside down. Don’t you feel bad that you’re missing out?" "The world isn’t that easily turned upside down," Haida replied. "It’s people who are turned upside down. I don’t feel bad about missing that.
Haruki Murakami - Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

thousandthoughtsatonce said: I love all of these Murakami cats. Do you know any of the names of Murakami's own cats? I'm sure I have seen some mentioned in an interview somewhere

Peter, Muse, Kirin, Butch, Sandance, Shimaneko, Mike, Scotty, Kuro, and Tobimaru. (source: Murakami Haruki Times)

-Mari

a-chinese-boy:

i really may be in love with Oshima 

a-chinese-boy:

i really may be in love with Oshima 

t-xxo:

At peace.

t-xxo:

At peace.